xhyve: a quick how to

So here we are, xhyve finally usable, so how to use it?

Fetching the source and compiling it

To compile xhyve you need either Xcode or at least the Xcode command line tools from Apple. If you not already have those installed run the following in a Terminal window:

xcode-select --install  

Now you're ready to checkout the source code and compile it:

git clone https://github.com/dunkelstern/xhyve.git xhyve  
cd xhyve  
git checkout sparse-disk-image  
make  

If everything worked the last lines of the make output should look something like this:

ld xhyve.sym  
dsym xhyve.dSYM  
strip xhyve  

If you want you could install the xhyve binary to /usr/local/bin now or just copy it somewhere where you'll find it:

sudo mkdir -p /usr/local/{bin,share/man/man1}  
sudo cp build/xhyve /usr/local/bin/  
sudo cp xhyve.1 /usr/local/share/man/man1/  

(It will ask for your password when using sudo, if you have Homebrew installed you might skip the sudo)

The first config file

A xhyve config file is a simple shell script, as xhyve takes all configuration in it's command line parameters.

What's possible

The best option to see what xhyve actually can do is the man page, but I will describe the basics to you nonetheless.

Open the man page with man ./xhyve.1 while you're in the source directory or just with man xhyve if you copied the binary and man-page into /usr/local.

So what can xhyve emulate:

ACPI

Command line parameter: -A

This is an option that should be set all the time except if you get weird ACPI related crashes.

Number of CPUs

Command line parameter: -c <number>

How many CPU cores you want to share with the guest operating system, defaults to one, maximum is 16.

Allocated RAM

Command line parameter: -m <number>

Amount of RAM to give to the guest operating system. You may use suffixes like k, m or g for Kilobytes, Megabytes or Gigabytes.

Virtual COM ports

Command line parameter: -l <source-device>,<destination-device>

This maps a virtual COM port (serial port) to a host device.
<source-device> may be either com1 or com2 and <destination-device> may be either stdio (to connect the serial port to the terminal window's console) or any character device in /dev/.

Virtual PCI bus

Command line parameter: -s <slot>,<emulation>,[config]

This is a bit more complex as it defines which hardware is connected to your VM.

<slot> is a number from 0 to 31 that defines the PCI slot.

<emulation> is the device to emulate. xhyve knows the following devices:

  • hostbridge, this is usually needed at slot 0 for most guests
  • virtio-net, a virtual network card
  • virtio-blk, a virtual block device (a disk)
  • ahci-cd, a virtual CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive
  • ahci-hd, a virtual disk for guests that have no virtio driver
  • uart, a virtual serial port (COM3+)
  • lpc, a PCI to ISA bridge, used for COM1 and COM2

Each of these has a specific configuration that may be set, see the man page for further instructions, an example of the usage follows.

Linux kernel to boot

Command line parameter: -f kexec,<kernel>,<initrd>,<kernel command line>

This essentially specifies which linux kernel to load. The problem with xhyve is that it has no BIOS or EFI emulation, so it loads the Linux kernel directly, this leads to a small inconvenience: We need the Kernel outside of the disk image.

What's needed

So this is all nice and good but which of these command line flags do we really need to get a standard Ubuntu running?

  • -A, for ACPI mode
  • -m 1G, 1GB RAM
  • -s 0,hostbridge -s 31,lpc, basically the minimum PCI config that works
  • -l com1,stdio, map the first serial port to the Terminal window
  • -s 1,ahci-cd,ubuntu-15.10-server-amd64.iso, the CD-ROM with the Ubuntu ISO inserted
  • -s 2,virtio-blk,hdd.img,sectorsize=4096,size=20G,split=1G,sparse, the main disk, 20GB max size, split into 1GB parts, use a sector size of 4096 (best choice for SSDs) and do not eat my harddisk space (sparse)
  • -f kexec,vmlinuz,initrd.gz,"earlyprintk console=ttyS0", load a linux kernel from the files vmlinuz and initrd.gz the kernel parameters tell Ubuntu to map the console to the first serial port so we can see the boot process in the Terminal.

All in one (save as install.sh):

# Linux
KERNEL="vmlinuz"  
INITRD="initrd.gz"  
CMDLINE="earlyprintk=serial console=ttyS0"

# Guest Config
MEM="-m 1G"  
IMG_CD="-s 1,ahci-cd,ubuntu-15.10-server-amd64.iso"  
IMG_HDD="-s 2,virtio-blk,hdd.img,size=20G,split=1G,sparse"  
NET="-s 3,virito-net,vmnet0"  
PCI_DEV="-s 0:0,hostbridge -s 31,lpc"  
LPC_DEV="-l com1,stdio"  
ACPI="-A"

# and now run
sudo xhyve $ACPI $MEM $PCI_DEV $LPC_DEV $NET $IMG_CD $IMG_HDD -f kexec,$KERNEL,$INITRD,"$CMDLINE"  

As you might have noticed, we run the xhyve binary as root this is because the xhyve binary has to be code signed with an Apple Developer Key or run as root to use the networking infrastructure. Let's just install Ubuntu and think about that later.

Installing ubuntu

As there is no graphical output we have to install Ubuntu Server (as only the Server version has the text-mode installer).

Go get it here: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/server

As you have read in the What's possible section, we need a Linux Kernel outside of our disk images to boot. So let's get one.

Extracting the setup kernel

As the Ubuntu install CD contains all files we need, why not just extract it from the disk image? Well there's one catch: Ubuntu uses a so called Mixed-Mode CD image and Mac OS X doesn't really like to mount such a disk so we have to resort to a small trick, execute the following on a Terminal to get the Kernel:

# create a 2k temporary file filled with zeroes
dd if=/dev/zero bs=2k count=1 of=tmp.iso

# append the ubuntu server image to that
dd if=ubuntu-15.10-server-amd64.iso bs=2k skip=1 >> tmp.iso

# mount it
hdiutil attach tmp.iso

# copy needed files
cp /Volumes/Ubuntu-Server\ 15/install/vmlinuz .  
cp /Volumes/Ubuntu-Server\ 15/install/initrd.gz .

# unmount it
hdiutil detach /Volumes/Ubuntu-Server\ 15  

You may want to keep tmp.iso or as well delete it as we have what we want. (Thanks to the people at pagetable for this neat trick)

Running the setup

If you saved the All in one script from above, make it executable with chmod a+x install.sh and run it.

If everything worked Ubuntu should boot in your Terminal.
Do not finish the setup yet, as you'll need to do something before:

Extracting the system kernel

When you finished setup you'll need to exchange which Kernel to load. The easiest thing to do that is by opening a console in the ubuntu installer. If it asks you if you want to finish the installation and reboot, don't do that but return to the main installer menu, there's an option Open a console that we need now.

After being dumped into the console make the installed target your change root:

chroot /target  
bash  
cd /boot  

Now open a second Terminal window on your Mac and run the following:

nc -l -p 1234 | tar x  

This starts a netcat server that listens on the port 1234 for a connection from the Ubuntu guest and expects to receive a tar file.

Now on the Ubuntu guest execute the following:

tar cv vmlinuz* initrd.img* | nc <ip_of_mac> 1234  

If everything worked you should have two files on your Mac:

  • vmlinuz-4.2.0-16-generic
  • initrd.img-4.2.0-16-generic

(The version number may differ)

Now finish the setup and let Ubuntu reboot. Rebooting should exit xhyve and dump you to your Mac console. This is correct!

Boot config

Now copy install.sh to boot.sh and make the following changes:

  • replace the files for INITRD and KERNEL with those you extracted from the VM
  • add root=/dev/vda1 to the Kernel command line after console=ttyS0
  • You may comment out the IMG_CD line

In future, to boot Ubuntu, you'll only need to run boot.sh and it will just work.

Johannes Schriewer

iOS and Linux developer. Tinkers with electronics and 3D-Printers, loves low-level stuff.

Augsburg, Germany, Planet Earth